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The Truth Behind Sports Drinks

Written by Nicole Griswold


The advertisement of sports drinks are often misleading and untrue. They are portrayed as being nourishing and necessary during all types of exercise. These days, unfortunately, most of the general public will believe anything they are told if they are being told it will make them healthier. Most people don’t even see them as a sports drink anymore. They’re being drank as an everyday beverage which should be pure water. Commercials, ads, and celebrity endorsements are just another ploy from the big beverage corporations.


Many of the mass produced drinks have brand names that sounds healthy, right? It’s a pretty good marketing ploy to help boost sales. It’s a trick to get consumers to believe they are nourishing the bodies and minds with liquid magic. Realistically, they should just name each drink “sugar” and call it a day. Experts in the fields of nutrition, epidemiology, and obesity are starting to blame the nation’s health epidemic on big beverage companies – but that’s an entirely different topic.  Would you trust a product from a corporation that has easily contributed to almost half of the United States being classified as obese?


There are many different brands of sports drinks out there. What do they all have in common? Extra calories and lots of sugar. The amount of added sugar is comparable to a can of your average cola drink. With these added negatives, most brands have produced a line of zero calorie or reduced calorie options. This will be a better choice but it will still contain artificial sweeteners and flavoring. Below you can find a generic label from a popular sports drink.


So, when are these drinks beneficial? Some types of sports drinks do provide athletes with necessary electrolytes post a vigorous exercise routine. After exercising for over 60 minutes of high intensity exercise, your body will most likely need a replenishment of sodium and electrolytes. This is where some of these drinks can come in handy but there is another loophole – you only need about a quarter of what’s in a large bottle to do the job. Body types and exercise intensity will vary regarding how much of the supplement you really need. In this case, less is more. Drinking an entire bottle after a workout will just add in some extra calories you tried so hard to burn. The excess sugar will convert to fat and the sodium will dry you out. Regarding the added vitamins, yes these are good for you but they are artificially produced so your body will not absorb them fully as they would in getting them from a natural source. Any of the vitamins and/or minerals listed on the bottles can be easily found in fresh fruits and vegetables.


The moral of the story is this – drink regular water. Your body runs off water and is 100% necessary for your survival. If you are involved in a high intensity exercise routine, having a low calorie sports drink available is a good idea. Just make sure to drink a recommended serving size or less. One large bottle can last you a long time if you use it correctly. Focus on lots of water and a balanced diet. And remember, with any food or drink – natural is best!

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